Category Archives: Inspirations

New Instagram Account

I’ve decided it’s time for Flies in my eyes to join modern society, and so I’ve opened a designated Instagram account for  daily(ish)  updates, pictures and mostly bits of what I do. So, you know, follow me!

Also you are more then welcome to tag me (@flies_in_my_eyes) on things you think I’ll enjoy and use my hashtag (#flies_in_my_eyes) to share with others stuff you ordered from me etcetera.

https://www.instagram.com/flies_in_my_eyes/?hl=en

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Toothless Backpack

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About a month prior to Halloween, I was contacted by the lovely Britny Gutierrez, who wanted to know if I could make a small light denim backpack for her 6 months old baby. She wanted to dress him up as Dustin from ‘Stranger Things’, which is pure genius in my opinion, since he doesn’t have his teeth out yet… Britny herself was (of course) going as Eleven.

We set up a price and I got to work. This is the outcome and Britny was gracious enough to send me some pictures of the complete costume. Her kid is adorable and the entire thing is so awesome! Well, you already know I’m a sucker for a good cosplay.

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And thanks to her, you can now also purchase The Light Denim Backpack on my Etsy page, for a costume or just for regular play. This backpack is specially made for toddlers who want big-children’s bag but are too small for it. It has no button, zipper or snap so it’s very easy for small hands to open, reach inside and fill up, and it has an overlap to help keep treasures secure inside.

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It’s Quilting Time!

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For some time now I’ve been harbouring a growing itch to start experimenting with quilting. It’s a form of design and sewing I’ve never tried, and recently got more and more exposed to it, starting with related Pinterest search results, this inspiring blog I stumbled upon, and just random items I started noticing, online and also in real-life.

So, after it was nesting in me for a while, two months ago I got my chance to try and quilt something. I decided I’ll sew a quilted baby blanket for my newest family member soon to be born. Now that he is all born and healthy (Mazal-Tov cute new nephew!), and I’ve given the present, I can finally share the process and the results here.

an Isosceles triangle!

A baby’s blanket was just what I’ve been waiting for, since it is quite small in size and fits a first attempt at quilting. But, because it’s me, of course I had to upgrade at least a tiny bit, and not to settle for the big-square-blocks frame of a normal person. I decided to go with triangles. Lots and lots of small triangles. I scribbled a pattern (basically an Isosceles triangle), while waiting for Idan to come back from the store with a shiny new rotary cutter (my first!). Then I started brutally cutting through a pile of blue and red leftover fabrics I had. It was tiresome, but the rotary cutter was a very good investment that saved me lots of time.

Ironing :(

When all of the cutting was just about done, came the mind-boggling phase of mixing and matching the parts. This took me a while, and also sent me back to the cutting board to better balance the colours some more, after which came the relaxing sewing phase. Eight rows of thirteen triangles each later, I was almost done.

I cut a backing fabric, and an Acrilan middle layer, and started sewing them together to the front, not before ironing the whole patchwork to make it nice and flat. Then came the top stitching, which gave the blanket a real puffy and nice look.

Cutting the back fabric

The whole process went surprisingly smooth. The mix-matching step was harder than I expected, and I wasn’t sure the combination looked remotely fine until it was sewed, and everything suddenly received shape. The one problem I did face was at the top quilting phase, as the sewing machine kept pulling the layers unequally and forced me to nip some parts. From the little I read online I got the impression that this is a common problem in quilting, and I guess purchasing a walking-foot would help, but it is very expensive and I’m not even sure it would do the job. A walking foot for my 215 Bernina would cost almost as much as a whole new (-yet cheaper and smaller, maybe even second hand-) sewing machine.

All in all, this took about a week of evening work (and a small while later, another evening for sewing the binding). It measures about 70 by 100 cm, and contains 106 triangles. And the most important part: it left me wanting to quilt again.

All finished!

Tom and Yoni’s Quiet Books

Book covers, reading “Tom’s Fabric Book” and “Yonatan’s Fabric Book”.

One of my favorite toys when I was a toddler was a soft book sewn in fabric, which had a different ‘mission’ in each page. I remember one page that had a tree with red apples attached by snaps, and I would “pick” them off and place them in a small pocket that looked like a basket. Another page had an outfit with a real belt that I was supposed to buckle and unbuckle. I don’t remember all its pages but I do know they were all focused on different wardrobe challenges (there were also zipper page, buttoning page and so on).

My mother didn’t remember anything about this book, so I started looking for evidence on the internet that I haven’t imagined this. When searching locally – I found nothing. At first I didn’t find anything even when I expanded my search for international results. This was just about when I’ve decided to use my magic sewing skills to make my kid and my nephew their own books. Then I researched some more and found out that these books are usually called ‘Quiet Books’, and this opened up a shiny new world of inspiration for me. Unfortunately for me, I have this thing where I think copying someone else’s work kinda misses the whole point in being creative, and therefore the more variety I see online, the harder I need to wrack my brain later in inventing new ways to go about it, making sure I can full-heartedly call the final product mine. I think the only page I left completely standard is the shoe-lacing page, as I vividly remember myself learning to tie my own shoes with it as a child.

During my research phase on this toy, I found some extraordinarily complicated and detailed creations that really got my creative juices going, but after some more thought on the subject I decided it was best to keep the book as simple as possible. For older kids complication is good, but I figured that for toddlers, it is best to keep the pages clean and avoid distractions, to help them focus on the assignment of each page.

Even so, I find the final pages I made varies widely in their levels. Tom is seventeen months old and his favorite page is the shape-matching page. He also loves the baby koala but cannot yet open the pocket’s zipper himself to get to it, not to mention much more advanced pages like the shoe laces or the horse’s braid that I haven’t even started showing him yet (he does like to pet the horse’s mane).

The materials I’ve used for the books are miscellaneous fabrics for the pages themselves, and jeans for the cover. I layered the covers with acrylic filling for a softer, puffier, pillow-like fill. most of the details inside the books are sewn from colorful felt, in order to simplify the sewing process (no fraying). I also used parts of old clothes which were headed outside, and therefore saved some fidgeting with buttons, button holes, snaps and pockets. Overall it took me about six months to design, pattern, cut and sew the two books, all in between other projects, of course, when Tom is asleep.

 

braiding and snaping

On the left: braiding page. The horse’s tail can be braided and unbraided, and decorated with hair clips from the basket.
On the right: snaps page. Underneath are family pictures.

zipping and clock reading

On the left: zipper page. Mommy koala has a cub in her pouch.
On the right: clock page. Move the clock’s hands around.

buttoning and Velcro-ing

On the left: buttoning page. Take the tooth-brush bunny out of the pocket, bring it to the mirror and brush it’s teeth.
On the right: Velcro page. Match the shapes to their proper place.

tying and hatching

On the left: shoe lacing page. Tie and untie the shoelace.
On the right: hatching page. Help the chick out of it’s egg.

 

Front and back cover

Front and back cover.

Red Sparklers–The saga continues…

Red Sparklers brooch & cat

Dorothy’s Bling Bling shoes continue to inspire me. After showing you the wall decoration I made and giving you a detailed walk-through,  I was sure this was going to be my final entry about these red sparklers. And yet, I find myself attracted to create more, probably because these shoes combine together three of the most wonderful thing on the planet: magic, sparkle, and shoes.

Anyway, I wanted to share with you two cute things I made a while ago and forgot all about, until watching the new Oz the Great and Powerful movie last week (even though the magic shoes weren’t in this film at all):

Red Sparklers brooch: made  from Fimo, with little  Swarovski stones.

Red Sparklers brooch

The wicked witch of the east  bookmark: the credit for this awesome idea is to Kira Nichols from oops i craft my pants. I just added the witch’s body and the yellow brick road instead of her cardboard piece. Made from Fimo, paper and a transparent wallpaper for an improvised lamination.

my wicked witch of the east bookmark

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Typography on the Street

On my way home from work the other day, I passed by this pile of letters on the side-walk, waiting to be signposted above a store.

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As mundane as the reason the letters were there, when I first saw them I wasn’t sure what I was looking at. It was weird and unexpected to see letters out of context, not in a book or on a sign, but simply  lying about. It still feels surprisingly magical and quite inspiring.

The TARDIS Dress Costume

Photo by Noa PAfter finally posting all about last year’s home-made Purim costume, I realized I also wanted to share this year’s costume I made for my dear friend Danielle, according to her request.

Danielle is a big “Dr. Who” fan, and she asked me for a police box dress, and sent me this link as a good place to start. Anyway, here is what I came up with, and you can see the result on Danielle herself:

 

Photo by Noa P

To complete the total look of the TARDIS, Danielle made a matching head piece with a real light bulb that shines. She also had Galaxy nail art on her finger nails (same concept of what I’ve done here), to fit the all timey-wimey atmosphere.