Tag Archives: baby boy

Toothless Backpack

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About a month prior to Halloween, I was contacted by the lovely Britny Gutierrez, who wanted to know if I could make a small light denim backpack for her 6 months old baby. She wanted to dress him up as Dustin from ‘Stranger Things’, which is pure genius in my opinion, since he doesn’t have his teeth out yet… Britny herself was (of course) going as Eleven.

We set up a price and I got to work. This is the outcome and Britny was gracious enough to send me some pictures of the complete costume. Her kid is adorable and the entire thing is so awesome! Well, you already know I’m a sucker for a good cosplay.

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And thanks to her, you can now also purchase The Light Denim Backpack on my Etsy page, for a costume or just for regular play. This backpack is specially made for toddlers who want big-children’s bag but are too small for it. It has no button, zipper or snap so it’s very easy for small hands to open, reach inside and fill up, and it has an overlap to help keep treasures secure inside.

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Renewing Flies in my eyes Online Store!

I finally Renewed my online Etsy store! There is still a lot of work to be done, but I managed to upload my first  babies and toddlers’ listings and the shop is starting to reflect my currant interests. This is very exiting for me, and even though everything is made in baby steps I am very pleased with my progress and outcome. Please check it out and add my shop to your favorites to get updates and easy access.

The Autumn Stars Baby QuiltThe Cute Watermelons Baby Quilt

The Tractors & Flowers Red & Blue Baby Quilt - with dark blueThe Brown & Pink Penguins Baby Quilt

Hold the press!

I got an exclusive pic of our newest family member posing his new quilt  Winking smile

New ♥

It’s Quilting Time!

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For some time now I’ve been harbouring a growing itch to start experimenting with quilting. It’s a form of design and sewing I’ve never tried, and recently got more and more exposed to it, starting with related Pinterest search results, this inspiring blog I stumbled upon, and just random items I started noticing, online and also in real-life.

So, after it was nesting in me for a while, two months ago I got my chance to try and quilt something. I decided I’ll sew a quilted baby blanket for my newest family member soon to be born. Now that he is all born and healthy (Mazal-Tov cute new nephew!), and I’ve given the present, I can finally share the process and the results here.

an Isosceles triangle!

A baby’s blanket was just what I’ve been waiting for, since it is quite small in size and fits a first attempt at quilting. But, because it’s me, of course I had to upgrade at least a tiny bit, and not to settle for the big-square-blocks frame of a normal person. I decided to go with triangles. Lots and lots of small triangles. I scribbled a pattern (basically an Isosceles triangle), while waiting for Idan to come back from the store with a shiny new rotary cutter (my first!). Then I started brutally cutting through a pile of blue and red leftover fabrics I had. It was tiresome, but the rotary cutter was a very good investment that saved me lots of time.

Ironing :(

When all of the cutting was just about done, came the mind-boggling phase of mixing and matching the parts. This took me a while, and also sent me back to the cutting board to better balance the colours some more, after which came the relaxing sewing phase. Eight rows of thirteen triangles each later, I was almost done.

I cut a backing fabric, and an Acrilan middle layer, and started sewing them together to the front, not before ironing the whole patchwork to make it nice and flat. Then came the top stitching, which gave the blanket a real puffy and nice look.

Cutting the back fabric

The whole process went surprisingly smooth. The mix-matching step was harder than I expected, and I wasn’t sure the combination looked remotely fine until it was sewed, and everything suddenly received shape. The one problem I did face was at the top quilting phase, as the sewing machine kept pulling the layers unequally and forced me to nip some parts. From the little I read online I got the impression that this is a common problem in quilting, and I guess purchasing a walking-foot would help, but it is very expensive and I’m not even sure it would do the job. A walking foot for my 215 Bernina would cost almost as much as a whole new (-yet cheaper and smaller, maybe even second hand-) sewing machine.

All in all, this took about a week of evening work (and a small while later, another evening for sewing the binding). It measures about 70 by 100 cm, and contains 106 triangles. And the most important part: it left me wanting to quilt again.

All finished!

Fabric Bed Rail

Fabric Bed Rail

Last week we leveled up in our sleep arrangements, as we moved our boy from a crib to a bed. On the second day I found out it wasn’t enough to have bed rails on just one side of the bed, as Tom managed to partially fall between the bed and the wall…
After some thought I improvised  a fabric bed rail, using this pretty matrushka (nestling doll) quilted fabric I bought in Japan once upon a time, and never decided what to do with it. 

It looks natural in a child’s room, and is fairly strong and does a good job of preventing him from falling.

Tom fools around in his new bed

Tom and Yoni’s Quiet Books

Book covers, reading “Tom’s Fabric Book” and “Yonatan’s Fabric Book”.

One of my favorite toys when I was a toddler was a soft book sewn in fabric, which had a different ‘mission’ in each page. I remember one page that had a tree with red apples attached by snaps, and I would “pick” them off and place them in a small pocket that looked like a basket. Another page had an outfit with a real belt that I was supposed to buckle and unbuckle. I don’t remember all its pages but I do know they were all focused on different wardrobe challenges (there were also zipper page, buttoning page and so on).

My mother didn’t remember anything about this book, so I started looking for evidence on the internet that I haven’t imagined this. When searching locally – I found nothing. At first I didn’t find anything even when I expanded my search for international results. This was just about when I’ve decided to use my magic sewing skills to make my kid and my nephew their own books. Then I researched some more and found out that these books are usually called ‘Quiet Books’, and this opened up a shiny new world of inspiration for me. Unfortunately for me, I have this thing where I think copying someone else’s work kinda misses the whole point in being creative, and therefore the more variety I see online, the harder I need to wrack my brain later in inventing new ways to go about it, making sure I can full-heartedly call the final product mine. I think the only page I left completely standard is the shoe-lacing page, as I vividly remember myself learning to tie my own shoes with it as a child.

During my research phase on this toy, I found some extraordinarily complicated and detailed creations that really got my creative juices going, but after some more thought on the subject I decided it was best to keep the book as simple as possible. For older kids complication is good, but I figured that for toddlers, it is best to keep the pages clean and avoid distractions, to help them focus on the assignment of each page.

Even so, I find the final pages I made varies widely in their levels. Tom is seventeen months old and his favorite page is the shape-matching page. He also loves the baby koala but cannot yet open the pocket’s zipper himself to get to it, not to mention much more advanced pages like the shoe laces or the horse’s braid that I haven’t even started showing him yet (he does like to pet the horse’s mane).

The materials I’ve used for the books are miscellaneous fabrics for the pages themselves, and jeans for the cover. I layered the covers with acrylic filling for a softer, puffier, pillow-like fill. most of the details inside the books are sewn from colorful felt, in order to simplify the sewing process (no fraying). I also used parts of old clothes which were headed outside, and therefore saved some fidgeting with buttons, button holes, snaps and pockets. Overall it took me about six months to design, pattern, cut and sew the two books, all in between other projects, of course, when Tom is asleep.

 

braiding and snaping

On the left: braiding page. The horse’s tail can be braided and unbraided, and decorated with hair clips from the basket.
On the right: snaps page. Underneath are family pictures.

zipping and clock reading

On the left: zipper page. Mommy koala has a cub in her pouch.
On the right: clock page. Move the clock’s hands around.

buttoning and Velcro-ing

On the left: buttoning page. Take the tooth-brush bunny out of the pocket, bring it to the mirror and brush it’s teeth.
On the right: Velcro page. Match the shapes to their proper place.

tying and hatching

On the left: shoe lacing page. Tie and untie the shoelace.
On the right: hatching page. Help the chick out of it’s egg.

 

Front and back cover

Front and back cover.

You Remind Me of the Babe

 It's only forever, not long at all.

This year Idan thought of a perfect costume idea months ago, so I had sufficient time to make something quite detailed (oh, I would LOVE to have another day or two at the end, but that’s a common side-effect of procrastination).

The idea was to dress as characters from the legendary movie Labyrinth:  Jareth (the goblin king played by David Bowie), Sarah (sixteen year old Jennifer Connelly) and Toby (the baby). We knew this year was our only chance for such a costume, as Tom is at a perfect age (and developmental stage) to be Toby.

Labyrinth

As Purim came closer, and party plans were made, it was decided that one of the events would include hiring a professional photographer. At first I wasn’t even sure I wanted that. Now I can’t believe I never did that before! I put so much energy into my costumes over the years, and I am never satisfied with the pictures I am left with. Anyway, I think this is the beginning of a new Purim tradition.

 So, the Labyrinth is a piece of cake, is it? Well, let's see how you deal with this little slice...

Jareth

The very first part of this costume I had to be certain I had was Jareth’s hair. Everything else I can manage by myself, but I had to find somewhere to buy that wig from. Once a suitable wig was found, everything else started fitting into place as well.

The black vest is a loan from my aunt. I couldn’t alter it much since I had to return it to her safely, so I just folded the lapels inwards to give it a better shape.

dance magic dance

For the shirt, I took a second-hand buttoned shirt and started refashioning it. I elevated the waistline way up, altered the sleeves’ tops and added few layers of puff to the cuffs. I also completely changed the collar (I worked this part directly on the shirt, using a mannequin), adding fabric.

The leggings I sewed from scratch, using this very clear and thorough tutorial on So Sew Easy. When I posted a question there asking how to properly fit the leggings to my man’s anatomy, Deby sent me to Ben’s amazing quest creating a superhero’s suit, where he graciously helped me finish the pattern.

As far as the boots go, I had no idea where to find a size 44 high black boots, so I decided to fake it, and sewed these shoe-covers.

Jareth's necklace

The necklace detail was a fun thing to make. I made it from Fimo and hoped it wouldn’t brake.

For a final touch Idan put on a blue eye lens in his right eye, and shaved off his beard! This hasn’t happened in years!

 I ask for so little. Just fear me, love me, do as I say and I will be your slave.

Toby

For Toby’s outfit, I kinda figured I would get a white romper and just paint red stripes on in, but when by chance I bumped into this knit, I knew I had to order it and sew the thing by myself.

What Babe?

For the pattern, I started with this jumpsuit pattern, but then decided to separate it to two pieces, keeping only the shirt and enlarging it, and making a new trousers pattern from scratch, including feet.

Sarah

My part of this costume was the most minor, and practically unrecognizable without Idan and Tom’s company, but I did try to make the most out of it anyway.

Like Jareth’s shirt, I took a second hand buttoned shirt and refashioned it: got rid of the front pocket, added gatherings to the sleeves’ top and redid the cuffs.

The vest was the part in Sarah’s outfit that required the largest amount of work: I took an old, heavily beaded vest, and started by unraveling all the beads and embellishments off it. I also tried dipping the entire thing in detergent to make it a lighter colour, but this technique didn’t work this time, so I decided to cover the entire thing with another fabric (I could’ve sewed a new vest entirely, but was a bit bummed out to let all the work on the old vest be for nothing). anyway, I cut out the vest pieces and drew the flowy-leafy pattern on them with a regular brown marker. Then I sewed the whole thing together again. I added a brooch to finish the look.

 You have no power over me!

I got Sarah’s ugly shoes in a second hand store for a few shekels. They were a bit too roomy for me, but two layers of socks and good insoles made them nice and snug.

Because Sarah’s outfit isn’t really that iconic in itself, it was extra important for me to get the make-up right. I re-invented my eyebrows completely and also gave much shading to the nose, to look a bit more like her.

 

Bonus Section

This has nothing to do with my costume, but since you came this far look what I found while searching for Labyrinth pictures on the web!